Gozi ISFB Remains Active in 2018, Leverages “Dark Cloud” Botnet For Distribution

cyber

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Gozi ISFB is a well-known and widely distributed banking trojan, and has been in the threat landscape for the past several years. Banking trojans are a type of malware that attackers leverage in an attempt to obtain banking credentials from customers of various financial institutions. The source code associated with Gozi ISFB has been leaked several times over the years, and the robust features available within the Gozi ISFB code base have since been integrated into additional malware, such as GozNym. Talos published detailed research about GozNym in a September 2016 blog post. Since then, Talos has been monitoring Gozi ISFB activity, and has discovered a series of campaigns over the past six month that have been making use of the elusive “Dark Cloud” botnet for distribution. In investigating the infrastructure associated with Dark Cloud, we identified a significant amount of malicious activity making use of this same infrastructure, including Gozi ISFB distribution, Nymaim command and control, and a variety of different spam campaigns and scam activity. Talos is publishing details related to ongoing Gozi ISFB activity, the Dark Cloud botnet, as well as the additional threats we have observed using this infrastructure over the past couple of years.

CAMPAIGN DETAILS

Talos has observed several distribution campaigns over the past few months that exhibit unusual characteristics. These campaigns appear to be relatively low-volume, with the attackers choosing to target specific organizations. They do not appear to send large amounts of spam messages to the organizations being targeted, instead choosing to stay under the radar while putting extra effort into the creation of convincing emails, in an attempt to evade detection while maximizing the likelihood that the victim will open the attached files.

Our engineers have discovered that while the Gozi ISFB campaigns are ongoing, the distribution and C2 infrastructure does not appear to stay active for extended periods, making analysis of older campaigns and samples more difficult. The attackers appear to be very quickly moving to new domains and IP addresses, not only for each campaign, but also for individual emails that are part of the same campaign. The campaigns that Talos analyzed took place during the fourth quarter of 2017, and have continued into 2018, with new campaigns being launched every week in an attempt to ensnare more victims and generate revenue for the attackers.

MALICIOUS SPAM CAMPAIGNS

This malware is distributed using malicious spam email campaigns, which feature Microsoft Word file attachments that function as malware downloaders. The emails appear targeted in nature, an example of which is shown below.

Interestingly, the attackers chose to create emails that appear to be part of an existing email thread, likely in an attempt to convince the victim of their legitimacy. In addition to crafting the email delivering the malicious Word document, they also create additional email subjects and accompanying bodies, which were included with the malicious email. This is not something that is typically seen in most malicious email campaigns, and shows the level of effort the attackers put into making the emails seem legitimate to maximize the likelihood that the victim would open the attached file.

Figure 1: Example Email Message

When opened, the attached Word document displays the following decoy image that makes it appear as if the attachment is a document that was created using Office 365. It instructs the user to “Enable Editing” and then “Enable Content.”

To read the original article:

https://blog.talosintelligence.com/2018/03/gozi-isfb-remains-active-in-2018.html#more

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