Cryptocurrency Mining Malware Hits Monitoring Systems at European Water Utility

Malware Chewed Up CPU of HMI at Wastewater Facility

Cryptocurrency mining malware worked its way onto four servers connected to an operational technology (OT) network at a wastewater facility in Europe, industrial cybersecurity firm Radiflow told SecurityWeek Wednesday.

Radiflow says the incident is the first documented cryptocurrency malware attack to hit an OT network of a critical infrastructure operator.

The servers were running Windows XP and CIMPLICITY SCADA software from GE Digital.

“In this case the [infected] server was a Human Machine Interface (HMI),”  Yehonatan Kfir, CTO at Radiflow, told SecurityWeek. “The main problem,” Kfir continued “is that this kind of malware in an OT network slows down the HMIs. Those servers are responsible for monitoring physical processes.”

Radiflow wasn’t able to name the exact family of malware it found, but said the threat was designed to mine Monero cryptocurrency and was discovered as part of routine monitoring of the OT network of the water utility customer.

“A cryptocurrency malware attack increases device CPU and network bandwidth consumption, causing the response times of tools used to monitor physical changes on an OT network, such as HMI and SCADA servers, to be severely impaired,” the company explained. “This, in turn, reduces the control a critical infrastructure operator has over its operations and slows down its response times to operational problems.”

While the investigation is still underway, Radiflow’s team has determined that the cryptocurrency malware was designed to run in a stealth mode on a computer or device, and even disable its security tools in order to operate undetected and maximize its mining processes for as long as possible.

“Cryptocurrency malware attacks involve extremely high CPU processing and network bandwidth consumption, which can threaten the stability and availability of the physical process of a critical infrastructure operator,” Kfir said. “While it is known that ransomware attacks have been launched on OT networks, this new case of a cryptocurrency malware attack on an OT network poses new threats as it runs in stealth mode and can remain undetected over time.”

“PCs in an OT network run sensitive HMI and SCADA applications that cannot get the latest Windows, antivirus and other important updates, and will always be vulnerable to malware attacks,” Kfir said.

While the malware was able to infect an HMI machine at a critical infrastructure operator, the attack was likely not specifically targeted at the water utility.

Thousands of industrial facilities have their systems infected with common malware every year, and the number of attacks targeting ICS is higher than it appears, according to a 2017 report by industrial cybersecurity firm Dragos.

Existing public information on ICS attacks shows numbers that are either very high (e.g. over 500,000 attacks according to unspecified reports cited by Dragos), or very low (e.g. roughly 290 incidents per year reported by ICS-CERT). It its report, Dragos set out to provide more realistic numbers on malware infections in ICS, based on information available from public sources such as VirusTotal, Google and DNS data.

As part of a project it calls MIMICS (malware in modern ICS), Dragos was able to identify roughly 30,000 samples of malicious ICS files and installers dating back to 2003. Non-targeted infections involving viruses such as Sivis, Ramnit and Virut are the most common, followed by Trojans that can provide threat actors access to Internet-facing environments.

These incidents may not be as severe as targeted attacks and they are unlikely to cause physical damage or pose a safety risk. However, they can cause liability issues and downtime to operations, which leads to increased financial costs, Robert M. Lee, CEO and founder of Dragos, told SecurityWeek in March 2017.

To read the original article:

http://www.securityweek.com/cryptocurrency-mining-malware-hits-monitoring-systems-european-water-utility

 

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